National data

    Our nation faces an urgent and growing need for talent, and higher education is the key to meeting that need. That’s why Lumina Foundation focuses all of its energy and resources on one goal, what we call Goal 2025. We want to ensure that, by the year 2025, 60 percent of Americans hold a degree, certificate or other high-quality postsecondary credential.

    Each year in this report, we track the nation’s progress toward Goal 2025, focusing mainly on the working-age population (ages 25-64). According to the most recent available data (2014), 40.4 percent of these working-age Americans have at least a two-year degree — a slight increase over the previous year’s rate of 40 percent.

    But degree attainment isn’t the whole story. Lumina has always said that all high-quality postsecondary credentials — including certificates — should count toward attainment goals. And this year we are also able to quantify certificate attainment, an important factor in the Goal 2025 effort.

    This year, for the first time, we have reliable data showing that 4.9 percent of Americans hold a high-quality postsecondary certificate as their highest credential. This brings the nation’s overall postsecondary attainment rate to 45.3 percent.

    Clearly we’re making progress, but much more must be done if we are to reach Goal 2025 and thus address the nation’s pressing need for talent.

    The data in this report can be an important tool in that vital effort.

    Lumina began reporting the attainment rate (associate degree and higher) in 2008. That year, the rate in Alabama stood at 31.6 percent. In 2014, the most recent year for which data are available, the rate reached 33.7 percent.

    However, the degree attainment rate doesn’t tell the whole story. Lumina has always said that other postsecondary credentials — including certificates and certifications — should count toward national and state goals for attainment, with one important caveat. To count, non-degree credentials should be of high quality, which we define as having clear and transparent learning outcomes leading to further education and employment.

    Lumina began reporting the attainment rate (associate degree and higher) in 2008. That year, the rate in Alaska stood at 36.3 percent. In 2014, the most recent year for which data are available, the rate is again 36.3 percent.

    However, the degree attainment rate doesn’t tell the whole story. Lumina has always said that other postsecondary credentials — including certificates and certifications — should count toward national and state goals for attainment, with one important caveat. To count, non-degree credentials should be of high quality, which we define as having clear and transparent learning outcomes leading to further education and employment.

    Lumina began reporting the attainment rate (associate degree and higher) in 2008. That year, the rate in Arizona stood at 34.4 percent. In 2014, the most recent year for which data are available, the rate reached 36.8 percent.

    However, the degree attainment rate doesn’t tell the whole story. Lumina has always said that other postsecondary credentials — including certificates and certifications — should count toward national and state goals for attainment, with one important caveat. To count, non-degree credentials should be of high quality, which we define as having clear and transparent learning outcomes leading to further education and employment.

    Lumina began reporting the attainment rate (associate degree and higher) in 2008. That year, the rate in Arkansas stood at 26.5 percent. In 2014, the most recent year for which data are available, the rate reached 29.8 percent.

    However, the degree attainment rate doesn’t tell the whole story. Lumina has always said that other postsecondary credentials — including certificates and certifications — should count toward national and state goals for attainment, with one important caveat. To count, non-degree credentials should be of high quality, which we define as having clear and transparent learning outcomes leading to further education and employment.

    Lumina began reporting the attainment rate (associate degree and higher) in 2008. That year, the rate in California stood at 38.6 percent. In 2014, the most recent year for which data are available, the rate reached 40.2 percent.

    However, the degree attainment rate doesn’t tell the whole story. Lumina has always said that other postsecondary credentials — including certificates and certifications — should count toward national and state goals for attainment, with one important caveat. To count, non-degree credentials should be of high quality, which we define as having clear and transparent learning outcomes leading to further education and employment.

    Lumina began reporting the attainment rate (associate degree and higher) in 2008. That year, the rate in Colorado stood at 45.3 percent. In 2014, the most recent year for which data are available, the rate reached 48.2 percent.

    However, the degree attainment rate doesn’t tell the whole story. Lumina has always said that other postsecondary credentials — including certificates and certifications — should count toward national and state goals for attainment, with one important caveat. To count, non-degree credentials should be of high quality, which we define as having clear and transparent learning outcomes leading to further education and employment.

    Lumina began reporting the attainment rate (associate degree and higher) in 2008. That year, the rate in Connecticut stood at 46.6 percent. In 2014, the most recent year for which data are available, the rate reached 48.2 percent.

    However, the degree attainment rate doesn’t tell the whole story. Lumina has always said that other postsecondary credentials — including certificates and certifications — should count toward national and state goals for attainment, with one important caveat. To count, non-degree credentials should be of high quality, which we define as having clear and transparent learning outcomes leading to further education and employment.

    Lumina began reporting the attainment rate (associate degree and higher) in 2008. That year, the rate in Delaware stood at 37 percent. In 2014, the most recent year for which data are available, the rate reached 40.7 percent.

    However, the degree attainment rate doesn’t tell the whole story. Lumina has always said that other postsecondary credentials — including certificates and certifications — should count toward national and state goals for attainment, with one important caveat. To count, non-degree credentials should be of high quality, which we define as having clear and transparent learning outcomes leading to further education and employment.

    Lumina began reporting the attainment rate (associate degree and higher) in 2008. That year, the rate in Florida stood at 36.8 percent. In 2014, the most recent year for which data are available, the rate reached 38.9 percent.

    However, the degree attainment rate doesn’t tell the whole story. Lumina has always said that other postsecondary credentials — including certificates and certifications — should count toward national and state goals for attainment, with one important caveat. To count, non-degree credentials should be of high quality, which we define as having clear and transparent learning outcomes leading to further education and employment.

    Lumina began reporting the attainment rate (associate degree and higher) in 2008. That year, the rate in Georgia stood at 36.2 percent. In 2014, the most recent year for which data are available, the rate reached 38 percent.

    However, the degree attainment rate doesn’t tell the whole story. Lumina has always said that other postsecondary credentials — including certificates and certifications — should count toward national and state goals for attainment, with one important caveat. To count, non-degree credentials should be of high quality, which we define as having clear and transparent learning outcomes leading to further education and employment.

    Lumina began reporting the attainment rate (associate degree and higher) in 2008. That year, the rate in Hawaii stood at 42.3 percent. In 2014, the most recent year for which data are available, the rate reached 43.5 percent.

    However, the degree attainment rate doesn’t tell the whole story. Lumina has always said that other postsecondary credentials — including certificates and certifications — should count toward national and state goals for attainment, with one important caveat. To count, non-degree credentials should be of high quality, which we define as having clear and transparent learning outcomes leading to further education and employment.

    Lumina began reporting the attainment rate (associate degree and higher) in 2008. That year, the rate in Idaho stood at 34.8 percent. In 2014, the most recent year for which data are available, the rate reached 35.7 percent.

    However, the degree attainment rate doesn’t tell the whole story. Lumina has always said that other postsecondary credentials — including certificates and certifications — should count toward national and state goals for attainment, with one important caveat. To count, non-degree credentials should be of high quality, which we define as having clear and transparent learning outcomes leading to further education and employment.

    Lumina began reporting the attainment rate (associate degree and higher) in 2008. That year, the rate in Illinois stood at 40.8 percent. In 2014, the most recent year for which data are available, the rate reached 43.6 percent.

    However, the degree attainment rate doesn’t tell the whole story. Lumina has always said that other postsecondary credentials — including certificates and certifications — should count toward national and state goals for attainment, with one important caveat. To count, non-degree credentials should be of high quality, which we define as having clear and transparent learning outcomes leading to further education and employment.

    Lumina began reporting the attainment rate (associate degree and higher) in 2008. That year, the rate in Indiana stood at 33.4 percent. In 2014, the most recent year for which data are available, the rate reached 35.9 percent.

    However, the degree attainment rate doesn’t tell the whole story. Lumina has always said that other postsecondary credentials — including certificates and certifications — should count toward national and state goals for attainment, with one important caveat. To count, non-degree credentials should be of high quality, which we define as having clear and transparent learning outcomes leading to further education and employment.

    Lumina began reporting the attainment rate (associate degree and higher) in 2008. That year, the rate in Iowa stood at 38.8 percent. In 2014, the most recent year for which data are available, the rate reached 43.3 percent.

    However, the degree attainment rate doesn’t tell the whole story. Lumina has always said that other postsecondary credentials — including certificates and certifications — should count toward national and state goals for attainment, with one important caveat. To count, non-degree credentials should be of high quality, which we define as having clear and transparent learning outcomes leading to further education and employment.

    Lumina began reporting the attainment rate (associate degree and higher) in 2008. That year, the rate in Kansas stood at 40.5 percent. In 2014, the most recent year for which data are available, the rate reached 42.3 percent.

    However, the degree attainment rate doesn’t tell the whole story. Lumina has always said that other postsecondary credentials — including certificates and certifications — should count toward national and state goals for attainment, with one important caveat. To count, non-degree credentials should be of high quality, which we define as having clear and transparent learning outcomes leading to further education and employment.

    Lumina began reporting the attainment rate (associate degree and higher) in 2008. That year, the rate in Kentucky stood at 29.2 percent. In 2014, the most recent year for which data are available, the rate reached 32.5 percent.

    However, the degree attainment rate doesn’t tell the whole story. Lumina has always said that other postsecondary credentials — including certificates and certifications — should count toward national and state goals for attainment, with one important caveat. To count, non-degree credentials should be of high quality, which we define as having clear and transparent learning outcomes leading to further education and employment.

    Lumina began reporting the attainment rate (associate degree and higher) in 2008. That year, the rate in Louisiana stood at 27 percent. In 2014, the most recent year for which data are available, the rate reached 29.7 percent.

    However, the degree attainment rate doesn’t tell the whole story. Lumina has always said that other postsecondary credentials — including certificates and certifications — should count toward national and state goals for attainment, with one important caveat. To count, non-degree credentials should be of high quality, which we define as having clear and transparent learning outcomes leading to further education and employment.

    Lumina began reporting the attainment rate (associate degree and higher) in 2008. That year, the rate in Maine stood at 36.8 percent. In 2014, the most recent year for which data are available, the rate reached 41.3 percent.

    However, the degree attainment rate doesn’t tell the whole story. Lumina has always said that other postsecondary credentials — including certificates and certifications — should count toward national and state goals for attainment, with one important caveat. To count, non-degree credentials should be of high quality, which we define as having clear and transparent learning outcomes leading to further education and employment.

    Lumina began reporting the attainment rate (associate degree and higher) in 2008. That year, the rate in Maryland stood at 43.9 percent. In 2014, the most recent year for which data are available, the rate reached 46.9 percent.

    However, the degree attainment rate doesn’t tell the whole story. Lumina has always said that other postsecondary credentials — including certificates and certifications — should count toward national and state goals for attainment, with one important caveat. To count, non-degree credentials should be of high quality, which we define as having clear and transparent learning outcomes leading to further education and employment.

    Lumina began reporting the attainment rate (associate degree and higher) in 2008. That year, the rate in Massachusetts stood at 49.6 percent. In 2014, the most recent year for which data are available, the rate reached 52.4 percent.

    However, the degree attainment rate doesn’t tell the whole story. Lumina has always said that other postsecondary credentials — including certificates and certifications — should count toward national and state goals for attainment, with one important caveat. To count, non-degree credentials should be of high quality, which we define as having clear and transparent learning outcomes leading to further education and employment.

    Lumina began reporting the attainment rate (associate degree and higher) in 2008. That year, the rate in Michigan stood at 35.7 percent. In 2014, the most recent year for which data are available, the rate reached 39.3 percent.

    However, the degree attainment rate doesn’t tell the whole story. Lumina has always said that other postsecondary credentials — including certificates and certifications — should count toward national and state goals for attainment, with one important caveat. To count, non-degree credentials should be of high quality, which we define as having clear and transparent learning outcomes leading to further education and employment.

    Lumina began reporting the attainment rate (associate degree and higher) in 2008. That year, the rate in Minnesota stood at 45.1 percent. In 2014, the most recent year for which data are available, the rate reached 48.9 percent.

    However, the degree attainment rate doesn’t tell the whole story. Lumina has always said that other postsecondary credentials — including certificates and certifications — should count toward national and state goals for attainment, with one important caveat. To count, non-degree credentials should be of high quality, which we define as having clear and transparent learning outcomes leading to further education and employment.

    Lumina began reporting the attainment rate (associate degree and higher) in 2008. That year, the rate in Mississippi stood at 29.3 percent. In 2014, the most recent year for which data are available, the rate reached 31.4 percent.

    However, the degree attainment rate doesn’t tell the whole story. Lumina has always said that other postsecondary credentials — including certificates and certifications — should count toward national and state goals for attainment, with one important caveat. To count, non-degree credentials should be of high quality, which we define as having clear and transparent learning outcomes leading to further education and employment.

    Lumina began reporting the attainment rate (associate degree and higher) in 2008. That year, the rate in Missouri stood at 34.9 percent. In 2014, the most recent year for which data are available, the rate reached 38.1 percent.

    However, the degree attainment rate doesn’t tell the whole story. Lumina has always said that other postsecondary credentials — including certificates and certifications — should count toward national and state goals for attainment, with one important caveat. To count, non-degree credentials should be of high quality, which we define as having clear and transparent learning outcomes leading to further education and employment.

    Lumina began reporting the attainment rate (associate degree and higher) in 2008. That year, the rate in Montana stood at 37.7 percent. In 2014, the most recent year for which data are available, the rate reached 39.6 percent.

    However, the degree attainment rate doesn’t tell the whole story. Lumina has always said that other postsecondary credentials — including certificates and certifications — should count toward national and state goals for attainment, with one important caveat. To count, non-degree credentials should be of high quality, which we define as having clear and transparent learning outcomes leading to further education and employment.

    Lumina began reporting the attainment rate (associate degree and higher) in 2008. That year, the rate in Nebraska stood at 40.5 percent. In 2014, the most recent year for which data are available, the rate reached 44 percent.

    However, the degree attainment rate doesn’t tell the whole story. Lumina has always said that other postsecondary credentials — including certificates and certifications — should count toward national and state goals for attainment, with one important caveat. To count, non-degree credentials should be of high quality, which we define as having clear and transparent learning outcomes leading to further education and employment.

    Lumina began reporting the attainment rate (associate degree and higher) in 2008. That year, the rate in Nevada stood at 30.1 percent. In 2014, the most recent year for which data are available, the rate reached 31.3 percent.

    However, the degree attainment rate doesn’t tell the whole story. Lumina has always said that other postsecondary credentials — including certificates and certifications — should count toward national and state goals for attainment, with one important caveat. To count, non-degree credentials should be of high quality, which we define as having clear and transparent learning outcomes leading to further education and employment.

    Lumina began reporting the attainment rate (associate degree and higher) in 2008. That year, the rate in New Hampshire stood at 46 percent. In 2014, the most recent year for which data are available, the rate reached 47.2 percent.

    However, the degree attainment rate doesn’t tell the whole story. Lumina has always said that other postsecondary credentials — including certificates and certifications — should count toward national and state goals for attainment, with one important caveat. To count, non-degree credentials should be of high quality, which we define as having clear and transparent learning outcomes leading to further education and employment.

    Lumina began reporting the attainment rate (associate degree and higher) in 2008. That year, the rate in New Jersey stood at 44.6 percent. In 2014, the most recent year for which data are available, the rate reached 47.1 percent.

    However, the degree attainment rate doesn’t tell the whole story. Lumina has always said that other postsecondary credentials — including certificates and certifications — should count toward national and state goals for attainment, with one important caveat. To count, non-degree credentials should be of high quality, which we define as having clear and transparent learning outcomes leading to further education and employment.

    Lumina began reporting the attainment rate (associate degree and higher) in 2008. That year, the rate in New Mexico stood at 33.4 percent. In 2014, the most recent year for which data are available, the rate reached 34.6 percent.

    However, the degree attainment rate doesn’t tell the whole story. Lumina has always said that other postsecondary credentials — including certificates and certifications — should count toward national and state goals for attainment, with one important caveat. To count, non-degree credentials should be of high quality, which we define as having clear and transparent learning outcomes leading to further education and employment.

    Lumina began reporting the attainment rate (associate degree and higher) in 2008. That year, the rate in New York stood at 43.8 percent. In 2014, the most recent year for which data are available, the rate reached 46.3 percent.

    However, the degree attainment rate doesn’t tell the whole story. Lumina has always said that other postsecondary credentials — including certificates and certifications — should count toward national and state goals for attainment, with one important caveat. To count, non-degree credentials should be of high quality, which we define as having clear and transparent learning outcomes leading to further education and employment.

    Lumina began reporting the attainment rate (associate degree and higher) in 2008. That year, the rate in North Carolina stood at 36.9 percent. In 2014, the most recent year for which data are available, the rate reached 40.3 percent.

    However, the degree attainment rate doesn’t tell the whole story. Lumina has always said that other postsecondary credentials — including certificates and certifications — should count toward national and state goals for attainment, with one important caveat. To count, non-degree credentials should be of high quality, which we define as having clear and transparent learning outcomes leading to further education and employment.

    Lumina began reporting the attainment rate (associate degree and higher) in 2008. That year, the rate in North Dakota stood at 45.2 percent. In 2014, the most recent year for which data are available, the rate was again 45.2 percent.

    However, the degree attainment rate doesn’t tell the whole story. Lumina has always said that other postsecondary credentials — including certificates and certifications — should count toward national and state goals for attainment, with one important caveat. To count, non-degree credentials should be of high quality, which we define as having clear and transparent learning outcomes leading to further education and employment.

    Lumina began reporting the attainment rate (associate degree and higher) in 2008. That year, the rate in Ohio stood at 34.9 percent. In 2014, the most recent year for which data are available, the rate reached 38.2 percent.

    However, the degree attainment rate doesn’t tell the whole story. Lumina has always said that other postsecondary credentials — including certificates and certifications — should count toward national and state goals for attainment, with one important caveat. To count, non-degree credentials should be of high quality, which we define as having clear and transparent learning outcomes leading to further education and employment.

    Lumina began reporting the attainment rate (associate degree and higher) in 2008. That year, the rate in Oklahoma stood at 31.3 percent. In 2014, the most recent year for which data are available, the rate reached 33.1 percent.

    However, the degree attainment rate doesn’t tell the whole story. Lumina has always said that other postsecondary credentials — including certificates and certifications — should count toward national and state goals for attainment, with one important caveat. To count, non-degree credentials should be of high quality, which we define as having clear and transparent learning outcomes leading to further education and employment.

    Lumina began reporting the attainment rate (associate degree and higher) in 2008. That year, the rate in Oregon stood at 38.6 percent. In 2014, the most recent year for which data are available, the rate reached 40.7 percent.

    However, the degree attainment rate doesn’t tell the whole story. Lumina has always said that other postsecondary credentials — including certificates and certifications — should count toward national and state goals for attainment, with one important caveat. To count, non-degree credentials should be of high quality, which we define as having clear and transparent learning outcomes leading to further education and employment.

    Lumina began reporting the attainment rate (associate degree and higher) in 2008. That year, the rate in Pennsylvania stood at 37.9 percent. In 2014, the most recent year for which data are available, the rate reached 40.8 percent.

    However, the degree attainment rate doesn’t tell the whole story. Lumina has always said that other postsecondary credentials — including certificates and certifications — should count toward national and state goals for attainment, with one important caveat. To count, non-degree credentials should be of high quality, which we define as having clear and transparent learning outcomes leading to further education and employment.

    Lumina began reporting the attainment rate (associate degree and higher) in 2008. That year, the rate in Rhode Island stood at 41.4 percent. In 2014, the most recent year for which data are available, the rate was 41.1 percent.

    However, the degree attainment rate doesn’t tell the whole story. Lumina has always said that other postsecondary credentials — including certificates and certifications — should count toward national and state goals for attainment, with one important caveat. To count, non-degree credentials should be of high quality, which we define as having clear and transparent learning outcomes leading to further education and employment.

    Lumina began reporting the attainment rate (associate degree and higher) in 2008. That year, the rate in South Carolina stood at 34.4 percent. In 2014, the most recent year for which data are available, the rate reached 36.7 percent.

    However, the degree attainment rate doesn’t tell the whole story. Lumina has always said that other postsecondary credentials — including certificates and certifications — should count toward national and state goals for attainment, with one important caveat. To count, non-degree credentials should be of high quality, which we define as having clear and transparent learning outcomes leading to further education and employment.

    Lumina began reporting the attainment rate (associate degree and higher) in 2008. That year, the rate in South Dakota stood at 39.4 percent. In 2014, the most recent year for which data are available, the rate reached 43.1 percent.

    However, the degree attainment rate doesn’t tell the whole story. Lumina has always said that other postsecondary credentials — including certificates and certifications — should count toward national and state goals for attainment, with one important caveat. To count, non-degree credentials should be of high quality, which we define as having clear and transparent learning outcomes leading to further education and employment.

    Lumina began reporting the attainment rate (associate degree and higher) in 2008. That year, the rate in Tennessee stood at 31.3 percent. In 2014, the most recent year for which data are available, the rate reached 34.3 percent.

    However, the degree attainment rate doesn’t tell the whole story. Lumina has always said that other postsecondary credentials — including certificates and certifications — should count toward national and state goals for attainment, with one important caveat. To count, non-degree credentials should be of high quality, which we define as having clear and transparent learning outcomes leading to further education and employment.

    Lumina began reporting the attainment rate (associate degree and higher) in 2008. That year, the rate in Texas stood at 33.3 percent. In 2014, the most recent year for which data are available, the rate reached 35.8 percent.

    However, the degree attainment rate doesn’t tell the whole story. Lumina has always said that other postsecondary credentials — including certificates and certifications — should count toward national and state goals for attainment, with one important caveat. To count, non-degree credentials should be of high quality, which we define as having clear and transparent learning outcomes leading to further education and employment.

    Lumina began reporting the attainment rate (associate degree and higher) in 2008. That year, the rate in Utah stood at 40.3 percent. In 2014, the most recent year for which data are available, the rate reached 41.9 percent.

    However, the degree attainment rate doesn’t tell the whole story. Lumina has always said that other postsecondary credentials — including certificates and certifications — should count toward national and state goals for attainment, with one important caveat. To count, non-degree credentials should be of high quality, which we define as having clear and transparent learning outcomes leading to further education and employment.

    Lumina began reporting the attainment rate (associate degree and higher) in 2008. That year, the rate in Vermont stood at 43.6 percent. In 2014, the most recent year for which data are available, the rate reached 44.3 percent.

    However, the degree attainment rate doesn’t tell the whole story. Lumina has always said that other postsecondary credentials — including certificates and certifications — should count toward national and state goals for attainment, with one important caveat. To count, non-degree credentials should be of high quality, which we define as having clear and transparent learning outcomes leading to further education and employment.

    Lumina began reporting the attainment rate (associate degree and higher) in 2008. That year, the rate in Virginia stood at 43.4 percent. In 2014, the most recent year for which data are available, the rate reached 46.6 percent.

    However, the degree attainment rate doesn’t tell the whole story. Lumina has always said that other postsecondary credentials — including certificates and certifications — should count toward national and state goals for attainment, with one important caveat. To count, non-degree credentials should be of high quality, which we define as having clear and transparent learning outcomes leading to further education and employment.

    Lumina began reporting the attainment rate (associate degree and higher) in 2008. That year, the rate in Washington stood at 42 percent. In 2014, the most recent year for which data are available, the rate reached 44.6 percent.

    However, the degree attainment rate doesn’t tell the whole story. Lumina has always said that other postsecondary credentials — including certificates and certifications — should count toward national and state goals for attainment, with one important caveat. To count, non-degree credentials should be of high quality, which we define as having clear and transparent learning outcomes leading to further education and employment.

    Lumina began reporting the attainment rate (associate degree and higher) in 2008. That year, the rate in West Virginia stood at 25.6 percent. In 2014, the most recent year for which data are available, the rate reached 28.6 percent.

    However, the degree attainment rate doesn’t tell the whole story. Lumina has always said that other postsecondary credentials — including certificates and certifications — should count toward national and state goals for attainment, with one important caveat. To count, non-degree credentials should be of high quality, which we define as having clear and transparent learning outcomes leading to further education and employment.

    Lumina began reporting the attainment rate (associate degree and higher) in 2008. That year, the rate in Wisconsin stood at 38 percent. In 2014, the most recent year for which data are available, the rate reached 42.1 percent.

    However, the degree attainment rate doesn’t tell the whole story. Lumina has always said that other postsecondary credentials — including certificates and certifications — should count toward national and state goals for attainment, with one important caveat. To count, non-degree credentials should be of high quality, which we define as having clear and transparent learning outcomes leading to further education and employment.

    Lumina began reporting the attainment rate (associate degree and higher) in 2008. That year, the rate in Wyoming stood at 36 percent. In 2014, the most recent year for which data are available, the rate reached 38.4 percent.

    However, the degree attainment rate doesn’t tell the whole story. Lumina has always said that other postsecondary credentials — including certificates and certifications — should count toward national and state goals for attainment, with one important caveat. To count, non-degree credentials should be of high quality, which we define as having clear and transparent learning outcomes leading to further education and employment.

    This year, for the first time, we have nationally representative data on the number of Americans who hold high-quality postsecondary certificates; we now feel confident we can count these credentials toward attainment goals. In states, we are able to use estimates from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce on the number of residents who hold high-quality certificates as their highest earned credential. In Alabama, 3 percent of residents between the ages of 25 and 64 hold a high-quality certificate. This brings the state’s overall postsecondary attainment rate to 36.7 percent.

    As the data in this report make clear, increasing overall attainment is not the only challenge Alabama faces. There are also significant gaps in attainment that must be closed. While current systems work very well for many students, more postsecondary credentials must be earned by Americans who, by definition, are post-traditional learners. Compared with current students, they will be older; more will be African-American, Hispanic and Native American; and they will have lower incomes. Most will be first-generation students. The data in this report show the extent of the attainment gaps in Alabama by race and ethnicity.

    To date, 26 states have responded to the need to increase attainment by setting state attainment goals that meet Lumina’s criteria for rigor and efficacy (i.e., the goal is quantifiable, challenging, long term, addresses gaps, and is in statute and/or a strategic plan). Our analysis shows that Alabama has not set a goal that meets Lumina’s criteria; we urge state leaders to do so.

    This year, for the first time, we have nationally representative data on the number of Americans who hold high-quality postsecondary certificates; we now feel confident we can count these credentials toward attainment goals. In states, we are able to use estimates from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce on the number of residents who hold high-quality certificates as their highest earned credential. In Alaska, 7 percent of residents between the ages of 25 and 64 hold a high-quality certificate. This brings the state’s overall postsecondary attainment rate to 43.3 percent.

    As the data in this report make clear, increasing overall attainment is not the only challenge Alaska faces. There are also significant gaps in attainment that must be closed. While current systems work very well for many students, more postsecondary credentials must be earned by Americans who, by definition, are post-traditional learners. Compared with current students, they will be older; more will be African-American, Hispanic and Native American; and they will have lower incomes. Most will be first-generation students. The data in this report show the extent of the attainment gaps in Alaska by race and ethnicity.

    To date, 26 states have responded to the need to increase attainment by setting state attainment goals that meet Lumina’s criteria for rigor and efficacy (i.e., the goal is quantifiable, challenging, long term, addresses gaps, and is in statute and/or a strategic plan). Our analysis shows that Alaska has not set a goal that meets Lumina’s criteria; we urge state leaders to do so.

    This year, for the first time, we have nationally representative data on the number of Americans who hold high-quality postsecondary certificates; we now feel confident we can count these credentials toward attainment goals. In states, we are able to use estimates from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce on the number of residents who hold high-quality certificates as their highest earned credential. In Arizona, 12 percent of residents between the ages of 25 and 64 hold a high-quality certificate. This brings the state’s overall postsecondary attainment rate to 48.8 percent.

    As the data in this report make clear, increasing overall attainment is not the only challenge Arizona faces. There are also significant gaps in attainment that must be closed. While current systems work very well for many students, more postsecondary credentials must be earned by Americans who, by definition, are post-traditional learners. Compared with current students, they will be older; more will be African-American, Hispanic and Native American; and they will have lower incomes. Most will be first-generation students. The data in this report show the extent of the attainment gaps in Arizona by race and ethnicity.

    To date, 26 states have responded to the need to increase attainment by setting state attainment goals that meet Lumina’s criteria for rigor and efficacy (i.e., the goal is quantifiable, challenging, long term, addresses gaps, and is in statute and/or a strategic plan). Our analysis shows that Arizona has not set a goal that meets Lumina’s criteria; we urge state leaders to do so.

    This year, for the first time, we have nationally representative data on the number of Americans who hold high-quality postsecondary certificates; we now feel confident we can count these credentials toward attainment goals. In states, we are able to use estimates from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce on the number of residents who hold high-quality certificates as their highest earned credential. In Arkansas, 9 percent of residents between the ages of 25 and 64 hold a high-quality certificate. This brings the state’s overall postsecondary attainment rate to 38.8 percent.

    As the data in this report make clear, increasing overall attainment is not the only challenge Arkansas faces. There are also significant gaps in attainment that must be closed. While current systems work very well for many students, more postsecondary credentials must be earned by Americans who, by definition, are post-traditional learners. Compared with current students, they will be older; more will be African-American, Hispanic and Native American; and they will have lower incomes. Most will be first-generation students. The data in this report show the extent of the attainment gaps in Arkansas by race and ethnicity.

    To date, 26 states have responded to the need to increase attainment by setting state attainment goals that meet Lumina’s criteria for rigor and efficacy (i.e., the goal is quantifiable, challenging, long term, addresses gaps, and is in statute and/or a strategic plan). Arkansas is one of those 26 states.

    This year, for the first time, we have nationally representative data on the number of Americans who hold high-quality postsecondary certificates; we now feel confident we can count these credentials toward attainment goals. In states, we are able to use estimates from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce on the number of residents who hold high-quality certificates as their highest earned credential. In California, 7 percent of residents between the ages of 25 and 64 hold a high-quality certificate. This brings the state’s overall postsecondary attainment rate to 47.2 percent.

    As the data in this report make clear, increasing overall attainment is not the only challenge California faces. There are also significant gaps in attainment that must be closed. While current systems work very well for many students, more postsecondary credentials must be earned by Americans who, by definition, are post-traditional learners. Compared with current students, they will be older; more will be African-American, Hispanic and Native American; and they will have lower incomes. Most will be first-generation students. The data in this report show the extent of the attainment gaps in California by race and ethnicity.

    To date, 26 states have responded to the need to increase attainment by setting state attainment goals that meet Lumina’s criteria for rigor and efficacy (i.e., the goal is quantifiable, challenging, long term, addresses gaps, and is in statute and/or a strategic plan). Our analysis shows that California has not set a goal that meets Lumina’s criteria; we urge state leaders to do so.

    This year, for the first time, we have nationally representative data on the number of Americans who hold high-quality postsecondary certificates; we now feel confident we can count these credentials toward attainment goals. In states, we are able to use estimates from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce on the number of residents who hold high-quality certificates as their highest earned credential. In Colorado, 6 percent of residents between the ages of 25 and 64 hold a high-quality certificate. This brings the state’s overall postsecondary attainment rate to 54.2 percent.

    As the data in this report make clear, increasing overall attainment is not the only challenge Colorado faces. There are also significant gaps in attainment that must be closed. While current systems work very well for many students, more postsecondary credentials must be earned by Americans who, by definition, are post-traditional learners. Compared with current students, they will be older; more will be African-American, Hispanic and Native American; and they will have lower incomes. Most will be first-generation students. The data in this report show the extent of the attainment gaps in Colorado by race and ethnicity.

    To date, 26 states have responded to the need to increase attainment by setting state attainment goals that meet Lumina’s criteria for rigor and efficacy (i.e., the goal is quantifiable, challenging, long term, addresses gaps, and is in statute and/or a strategic plan). Colorado is one of those 26 states.

    This year, for the first time, we have nationally representative data on the number of Americans who hold high-quality postsecondary certificates; we now feel confident we can count these credentials toward attainment goals. In states, we are able to use estimates from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce on the number of residents who hold high-quality certificates as their highest earned credential. In Connecticut, 5 percent of residents between the ages of 25 and 64 hold a high-quality certificate. This brings the state’s overall postsecondary attainment rate to 53.2 percent.

    As the data in this report make clear, increasing overall attainment is not the only challenge Connecticut faces. There are also significant gaps in attainment that must be closed. While current systems work very well for many students, more postsecondary credentials must be earned by Americans who, by definition, are post-traditional learners. Compared with current students, they will be older; more will be African-American, Hispanic and Native American; and they will have lower incomes. Most will be first-generation students. The data in this report show the extent of the attainment gaps in Connecticut by race and ethnicity.

    To date, 26 states have responded to the need to increase attainment by setting state attainment goals that meet Lumina’s criteria for rigor and efficacy (i.e., the goal is quantifiable, challenging, long term, addresses gaps, and is in statute and/or a strategic plan). Connecticut is one of those 26 states.

    This year, for the first time, we have nationally representative data on the number of Americans who hold high-quality postsecondary certificates; we now feel confident we can count these credentials toward attainment goals. In states, we are able to use estimates from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce on the number of residents who hold high-quality certificates as their highest earned credential. In Delaware, 3 percent of residents between the ages of 25 and 64 hold a high-quality certificate. This brings the state’s overall postsecondary attainment rate to 43.7 percent.

    As the data in this report make clear, increasing overall attainment is not the only challenge Delaware faces. There are also significant gaps in attainment that must be closed. While current systems work very well for many students, more postsecondary credentials must be earned by Americans who, by definition, are post-traditional learners. Compared with current students, they will be older; more will be African-American, Hispanic and Native American; and they will have lower incomes. Most will be first-generation students. The data in this report show the extent of the attainment gaps in Delaware by race and ethnicity.

    To date, 26 states have responded to the need to increase attainment by setting state attainment goals that meet Lumina’s criteria for rigor and efficacy (i.e., the goal is quantifiable, challenging, long term, addresses gaps, and is in statute and/or a strategic plan). Our analysis shows that Delaware has not set a goal that meets Lumina’s criteria; we urge state leaders to do so.

    This year, for the first time, we have nationally representative data on the number of Americans who hold high-quality postsecondary certificates; we now feel confident we can count these credentials toward attainment goals. In states, we are able to use estimates from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce on the number of residents who hold high-quality certificates as their highest earned credential. In Florida, 7 percent of residents between the ages of 25 and 64 hold a high-quality certificate. This brings the state’s overall postsecondary attainment rate to 45.9 percent.

    As the data in this report make clear, increasing overall attainment is not the only challenge Florida faces. There are also significant gaps in attainment that must be closed. While current systems work very well for many students, more postsecondary credentials must be earned by Americans who, by definition, are post-traditional learners. Compared with current students, they will be older; more will be African-American, Hispanic and Native American; and they will have lower incomes. Most will be first-generation students. The data in this report show the extent of the attainment gaps in Florida by race and ethnicity.

    To date, 26 states have responded to the need to increase attainment by setting state attainment goals that meet Lumina’s criteria for rigor and efficacy (i.e., the goal is quantifiable, challenging, long term, addresses gaps, and is in statute and/or a strategic plan). Our analysis shows that Florida has not set a goal that meets Lumina’s criteria; we urge state leaders to do so.

    This year, for the first time, we have nationally representative data on the number of Americans who hold high-quality postsecondary certificates; we now feel confident we can count these credentials toward attainment goals. In states, we are able to use estimates from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce on the number of residents who hold high-quality certificates as their highest earned credential. In Georgia, 8 percent of residents between the ages of 25 and 64 hold a high-quality certificate. This brings the state’s overall postsecondary attainment rate to 46 percent.

    As the data in this report make clear, increasing overall attainment is not the only challenge Georgia faces. There are also significant gaps in attainment that must be closed. While current systems work very well for many students, more postsecondary credentials must be earned by Americans who, by definition, are post-traditional learners. Compared with current students, they will be older; more will be African-American, Hispanic and Native American; and they will have lower incomes. Most will be first-generation students. The data in this report show the extent of the attainment gaps in Georgia by race and ethnicity.

    To date, 26 states have responded to the need to increase attainment by setting state attainment goals that meet Lumina’s criteria for rigor and efficacy (i.e., the goal is quantifiable, challenging, long term, addresses gaps, and is in statute and/or a strategic plan). Georgia is one of those 26 states.

    This year, for the first time, we have nationally representative data on the number of Americans who hold high-quality postsecondary certificates; we now feel confident we can count these credentials toward attainment goals. In states, we are able to use estimates from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce on the number of residents who hold high-quality certificates as their highest earned credential. In Hawaii, 2 percent of residents between the ages of 25 and 64 hold a high-quality certificate. This brings the state’s overall postsecondary attainment rate to 45.5 percent.

    As the data in this report make clear, increasing overall attainment is not the only challenge Hawaii faces. There are also significant gaps in attainment that must be closed. While current systems work very well for many students, more postsecondary credentials must be earned by Americans who, by definition, are post-traditional learners. Compared with current students, they will be older; more will be African-American, Hispanic and Native American; and they will have lower incomes. Most will be first-generation students. The data in this report show the extent of the attainment gaps in Hawaii by race and ethnicity.

    To date, 26 states have responded to the need to increase attainment by setting state attainment goals that meet Lumina’s criteria for rigor and efficacy (i.e., the goal is quantifiable, challenging, long term, addresses gaps, and is in statute and/or a strategic plan). Hawaii is one of those 26 states.

    This year, for the first time, we have nationally representative data on the number of Americans who hold high-quality postsecondary certificates; we now feel confident we can count these credentials toward attainment goals. In states, we are able to use estimates from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce on the number of residents who hold high-quality certificates as their highest earned credential. In Idaho, 2 percent of residents between the ages of 25 and 64 hold a high-quality certificate. This brings the state’s overall postsecondary attainment rate to 37.7 percent.

    As the data in this report make clear, increasing overall attainment is not the only challenge Idaho faces. There are also significant gaps in attainment that must be closed. While current systems work very well for many students, more postsecondary credentials must be earned by Americans who, by definition, are post-traditional learners. Compared with current students, they will be older; more will be African-American, Hispanic and Native American; and they will have lower incomes. Most will be first-generation students. The data in this report show the extent of the attainment gaps in Idaho by race and ethnicity.

    To date, 26 states have responded to the need to increase attainment by setting state attainment goals that meet Lumina’s criteria for rigor and efficacy (i.e., the goal is quantifiable, challenging, long term, addresses gaps, and is in statute and/or a strategic plan). Idaho is one of those 26 states.

    This year, for the first time, we have nationally representative data on the number of Americans who hold high-quality postsecondary certificates; we now feel confident we can count these credentials toward attainment goals. In states, we are able to use estimates from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce on the number of residents who hold high-quality certificates as their highest earned credential. In Illinois, 6 percent of residents between the ages of 25 and 64 hold a high-quality certificate. This brings the state’s overall postsecondary attainment rate to 49.6 percent.

    As the data in this report make clear, increasing overall attainment is not the only challenge Illinois faces. There are also significant gaps in attainment that must be closed. While current systems work very well for many students, more postsecondary credentials must be earned by Americans who, by definition, are post-traditional learners. Compared with current students, they will be older; more will be African-American, Hispanic and Native American; and they will have lower incomes. Most will be first-generation students. The data in this report show the extent of the attainment gaps in Illinois by race and ethnicity.

    To date, 26 states have responded to the need to increase attainment by setting state attainment goals that meet Lumina’s criteria for rigor and efficacy (i.e., the goal is quantifiable, challenging, long term, addresses gaps, and is in statute and/or a strategic plan). Illinois is one of those 26 states.

    This year, for the first time, we have nationally representative data on the number of Americans who hold high-quality postsecondary certificates; we now feel confident we can count these credentials toward attainment goals. In states, we are able to use estimates from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce on the number of residents who hold high-quality certificates as their highest earned credential. In Indiana, 5 percent of residents between the ages of 25 and 64 hold a high-quality certificate. This brings the state’s overall postsecondary attainment rate to 40.9 percent.

    As the data in this report make clear, increasing overall attainment is not the only challenge Indiana faces. There are also significant gaps in attainment that must be closed. While current systems work very well for many students, more postsecondary credentials must be earned by Americans who, by definition, are post-traditional learners. Compared with current students, they will be older; more will be African-American, Hispanic and Native American; and they will have lower incomes. Most will be first-generation students. The data in this report show the extent of the attainment gaps in Indiana by race and ethnicity.

    To date, 26 states have responded to the need to increase attainment by setting state attainment goals that meet Lumina’s criteria for rigor and efficacy (i.e., the goal is quantifiable, challenging, long term, addresses gaps, and is in statute and/or a strategic plan). Indiana is one of those 26 states.

    This year, for the first time, we have nationally representative data on the number of Americans who hold high-quality postsecondary certificates; we now feel confident we can count these credentials toward attainment goals. In states, we are able to use estimates from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce on the number of residents who hold high-quality certificates as their highest earned credential. In Iowa, 4 percent of residents between the ages of 25 and 64 hold a high-quality certificate. This brings the state’s overall postsecondary attainment rate to 47.3 percent.

    As the data in this report make clear, increasing overall attainment is not the only challenge Iowa faces. There are also significant gaps in attainment that must be closed. While current systems work very well for many students, more postsecondary credentials must be earned by Americans who, by definition, are post-traditional learners. Compared with current students, they will be older; more will be African-American, Hispanic and Native American; and they will have lower incomes. Most will be first-generation students. The data in this report show the extent of the attainment gaps in Iowa by race and ethnicity.

    To date, 26 states have responded to the need to increase attainment by setting state attainment goals that meet Lumina’s criteria for rigor and efficacy (i.e., the goal is quantifiable, challenging, long term, addresses gaps, and is in statute and/or a strategic plan). Our analysis shows that Iowa has not set a goal that meets Lumina’s criteria; we urge state leaders to do so.

    This year, for the first time, we have nationally representative data on the number of Americans who hold high-quality postsecondary certificates; we now feel confident we can count these credentials toward attainment goals. In states, we are able to use estimates from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce on the number of residents who hold high-quality certificates as their highest earned credential. In Kansas, 7 percent of residents between the ages of 25 and 64 hold a high-quality certificate. This brings the state’s overall postsecondary attainment rate to 49.3 percent.

    As the data in this report make clear, increasing overall attainment is not the only challenge Kansas faces. There are also significant gaps in attainment that must be closed. While current systems work very well for many students, more postsecondary credentials must be earned by Americans who, by definition, are post-traditional learners. Compared with current students, they will be older; more will be African-American, Hispanic and Native American; and they will have lower incomes. Most will be first-generation students. The data in this report show the extent of the attainment gaps in Kansas by race and ethnicity.

    To date, 26 states have responded to the need to increase attainment by setting state attainment goals that meet Lumina’s criteria for rigor and efficacy (i.e., the goal is quantifiable, challenging, long term, addresses gaps, and is in statute and/or a strategic plan). Kansas is one of those 26 states.

    This year, for the first time, we have nationally representative data on the number of Americans who hold high-quality postsecondary certificates; we now feel confident we can count these credentials toward attainment goals. In states, we are able to use estimates from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce on the number of residents who hold high-quality certificates as their highest earned credential. In Kentucky, 10 percent of residents between the ages of 25 and 64 hold a high-quality certificate. This brings the state’s overall postsecondary attainment rate to 42.5 percent.

    As the data in this report make clear, increasing overall attainment is not the only challenge Kentucky faces. There are also significant gaps in attainment that must be closed. While current systems work very well for many students, more postsecondary credentials must be earned by Americans who, by definition, are post-traditional learners. Compared with current students, they will be older; more will be African-American, Hispanic and Native American; and they will have lower incomes. Most will be first-generation students. The data in this report show the extent of the attainment gaps in Kentucky by race and ethnicity.

    To date, 26 states have responded to the need to increase attainment by setting state attainment goals that meet Lumina’s criteria for rigor and efficacy (i.e., the goal is quantifiable, challenging, long term, addresses gaps, and is in statute and/or a strategic plan). Kentucky is one of those 26 states.

    This year, for the first time, we have nationally representative data on the number of Americans who hold high-quality postsecondary certificates; we now feel confident we can count these credentials toward attainment goals. In states, we are able to use estimates from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce on the number of residents who hold high-quality certificates as their highest earned credential. In Louisiana, 15 percent of residents between the ages of 25 and 64 hold a high-quality certificate. This brings the state’s overall postsecondary attainment rate to 44.7 percent.

    As the data in this report make clear, increasing overall attainment is not the only challenge Louisiana faces. There are also significant gaps in attainment that must be closed. While current systems work very well for many students, more postsecondary credentials must be earned by Americans who, by definition, are post-traditional learners. Compared with current students, they will be older; more will be African-American, Hispanic and Native American; and they will have lower incomes. Most will be first-generation students. The data in this report show the extent of the attainment gaps in Louisiana by race and ethnicity.

    To date, 26 states have responded to the need to increase attainment by setting state attainment goals that meet Lumina’s criteria for rigor and efficacy (i.e., the goal is quantifiable, challenging, long term, addresses gaps, and is in statute and/or a strategic plan). Louisiana is one of those 26 states.

    This year, for the first time, we have nationally representative data on the number of Americans who hold high-quality postsecondary certificates; we now feel confident we can count these credentials toward attainment goals. In states, we are able to use estimates from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce on the number of residents who hold high-quality certificates as their highest earned credential. In Maine, 2 percent of residents between the ages of 25 and 64 hold a high-quality certificate. This brings the state’s overall postsecondary attainment rate to 43.3 percent.

    As the data in this report make clear, increasing overall attainment is not the only challenge Maine faces. There are also significant gaps in attainment that must be closed. While current systems work very well for many students, more postsecondary credentials must be earned by Americans who, by definition, are post-traditional learners. Compared with current students, they will be older; more will be African-American, Hispanic and Native American; and they will have lower incomes. Most will be first-generation students. The data in this report show the extent of the attainment gaps in Maine by race and ethnicity.

    To date, 26 states have responded to the need to increase attainment by setting state attainment goals that meet Lumina’s criteria for rigor and efficacy (i.e., the goal is quantifiable, challenging, long term, addresses gaps, and is in statute and/or a strategic plan). Our analysis shows that Maine has not set a goal that meets Lumina’s criteria; we urge state leaders to do so.

    This year, for the first time, we have nationally representative data on the number of Americans who hold high-quality postsecondary certificates; we now feel confident we can count these credentials toward attainment goals. In states, we are able to use estimates from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce on the number of residents who hold high-quality certificates as their highest earned credential. In Maryland, 3 percent of residents between the ages of 25 and 64 hold a high-quality certificate. This brings the state’s overall postsecondary attainment rate to 49.9 percent.

    As the data in this report make clear, increasing overall attainment is not the only challenge Maryland faces. There are also significant gaps in attainment that must be closed. While current systems work very well for many students, more postsecondary credentials must be earned by Americans who, by definition, are post-traditional learners. Compared with current students, they will be older; more will be African-American, Hispanic and Native American; and they will have lower incomes. Most will be first-generation students. The data in this report show the extent of the attainment gaps in Maryland by race and ethnicity.

    To date, 26 states have responded to the need to increase attainment by setting state attainment goals that meet Lumina’s criteria for rigor and efficacy (i.e., the goal is quantifiable, challenging, long term, addresses gaps, and is in statute and/or a strategic plan). Maryland is one of those 26 states.

    This year, for the first time, we have nationally representative data on the number of Americans who hold high-quality postsecondary certificates; we now feel confident we can count these credentials toward attainment goals. In states, we are able to use estimates from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce on the number of residents who hold high-quality certificates as their highest earned credential. In Massachusetts, 3 percent of residents between the ages of 25 and 64 hold a high-quality certificate. This brings the state’s overall postsecondary attainment rate to 55.4 percent.

    As the data in this report make clear, increasing overall attainment is not the only challenge Massachusetts faces. There are also significant gaps in attainment that must be closed. While current systems work very well for many students, more postsecondary credentials must be earned by Americans who, by definition, are post-traditional learners. Compared with current students, they will be older; more will be African-American, Hispanic and Native American; and they will have lower incomes. Most will be first-generation students. The data in this report show the extent of the attainment gaps in Massachusetts by race and ethnicity.

    To date, 26 states have responded to the need to increase attainment by setting state attainment goals that meet Lumina’s criteria for rigor and efficacy (i.e., the goal is quantifiable, challenging, long term, addresses gaps, and is in statute and/or a strategic plan). Massachusetts is one of those 26 states.

    This year, for the first time, we have nationally representative data on the number of Americans who hold high-quality postsecondary certificates; we now feel confident we can count these credentials toward attainment goals. In states, we are able to use estimates from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce on the number of residents who hold high-quality certificates as their highest earned credential. In Michigan, 4 percent of residents between the ages of 25 and 64 hold a high-quality certificate. This brings the state’s overall postsecondary attainment rate to 43.3 percent.

    As the data in this report make clear, increasing overall attainment is not the only challenge Michigan faces. There are also significant gaps in attainment that must be closed. While current systems work very well for many students, more postsecondary credentials must be earned by Americans who, by definition, are post-traditional learners. Compared with current students, they will be older; more will be African-American, Hispanic and Native American; and they will have lower incomes. Most will be first-generation students. The data in this report show the extent of the attainment gaps in Michigan by race and ethnicity.

    To date, 26 states have responded to the need to increase attainment by setting state attainment goals that meet Lumina’s criteria for rigor and efficacy (i.e., the goal is quantifiable, challenging, long term, addresses gaps, and is in statute and/or a strategic plan). Our analysis shows that Michigan has not set a goal that meets Lumina’s criteria; we urge state leaders to do so.

    This year, for the first time, we have nationally representative data on the number of Americans who hold high-quality postsecondary certificates; we now feel confident we can count these credentials toward attainment goals. In states, we are able to use estimates from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce on the number of residents who hold high-quality certificates as their highest earned credential. In Minnesota, 4 percent of residents between the ages of 25 and 64 hold a high-quality certificate. This brings the state’s overall postsecondary attainment rate to 52.9 percent.

    As the data in this report make clear, increasing overall attainment is not the only challenge Minnesota faces. There are also significant gaps in attainment that must be closed. While current systems work very well for many students, more postsecondary credentials must be earned by Americans who, by definition, are post-traditional learners. Compared with current students, they will be older; more will be African-American, Hispanic and Native American; and they will have lower incomes. Most will be first-generation students. The data in this report show the extent of the attainment gaps in Minnesota by race and ethnicity.

    To date, 26 states have responded to the need to increase attainment by setting state attainment goals that meet Lumina’s criteria for rigor and efficacy (i.e., the goal is quantifiable, challenging, long term, addresses gaps, and is in statute and/or a strategic plan). Minnesota is one of those 26 states.

    This year, for the first time, we have nationally representative data on the number of Americans who hold high-quality postsecondary certificates; we now feel confident we can count these credentials toward attainment goals. In states, we are able to use estimates from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce on the number of residents who hold high-quality certificates as their highest earned credential. In Mississippi, 5 percent of residents between the ages of 25 and 64 hold a high-quality certificate. This brings the state’s overall postsecondary attainment rate to 36.4 percent.

    As the data in this report make clear, increasing overall attainment is not the only challenge Mississippi faces. There are also significant gaps in attainment that must be closed. While current systems work very well for many students, more postsecondary credentials must be earned by Americans who, by definition, are post-traditional learners. Compared with current students, they will be older; more will be African-American, Hispanic and Native American; and they will have lower incomes. Most will be first-generation students. The data in this report show the extent of the attainment gaps in Mississippi by race and ethnicity.

    To date, 26 states have responded to the need to increase attainment by setting state attainment goals that meet Lumina’s criteria for rigor and efficacy (i.e., the goal is quantifiable, challenging, long term, addresses gaps, and is in statute and/or a strategic plan). Our analysis shows that Mississippi has not set a goal that meets Lumina’s criteria; we urge state leaders to do so.

    This year, for the first time, we have nationally representative data on the number of Americans who hold high-quality postsecondary certificates; we now feel confident we can count these credentials toward attainment goals. In states, we are able to use estimates from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce on the number of residents who hold high-quality certificates as their highest earned credential. In Missouri, 4 percent of residents between the ages of 25 and 64 hold a high-quality certificate. This brings the state’s overall postsecondary attainment rate to 42.1 percent.

    As the data in this report make clear, increasing overall attainment is not the only challenge Missouri faces. There are also significant gaps in attainment that must be closed. While current systems work very well for many students, more postsecondary credentials must be earned by Americans who, by definition, are post-traditional learners. Compared with current students, they will be older; more will be African-American, Hispanic and Native American; and they will have lower incomes. Most will be first-generation students. The data in this report show the extent of the attainment gaps in Missouri by race and ethnicity.

    To date, 26 states have responded to the need to increase attainment by setting state attainment goals that meet Lumina’s criteria for rigor and efficacy (i.e., the goal is quantifiable, challenging, long term, addresses gaps, and is in statute and/or a strategic plan). Missouri is one of those 26 states.

    This year, for the first time, we have nationally representative data on the number of Americans who hold high-quality postsecondary certificates; we now feel confident we can count these credentials toward attainment goals. In states, we are able to use estimates from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce on the number of residents who hold high-quality certificates as their highest earned credential. In Montana, 2 percent of residents between the ages of 25 and 64 hold a high-quality certificate. This brings the state’s overall postsecondary attainment rate to 41.6 percent.

    As the data in this report make clear, increasing overall attainment is not the only challenge Montana faces. There are also significant gaps in attainment that must be closed. While current systems work very well for many students, more postsecondary credentials must be earned by Americans who, by definition, are post-traditional learners. Compared with current students, they will be older; more will be African-American, Hispanic and Native American; and they will have lower incomes. Most will be first-generation students. The data in this report show the extent of the attainment gaps in Montana by race and ethnicity.

    To date, 26 states have responded to the need to increase attainment by setting state attainment goals that meet Lumina’s criteria for rigor and efficacy (i.e., the goal is quantifiable, challenging, long term, addresses gaps, and is in statute and/or a strategic plan). Montana is one of those 26 states.

    This year, for the first time, we have nationally representative data on the number of Americans who hold high-quality postsecondary certificates; we now feel confident we can count these credentials toward attainment goals. In states, we are able to use estimates from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce on the number of residents who hold high-quality certificates as their highest earned credential. In Nebraska, 3 percent of residents between the ages of 25 and 64 hold a high-quality certificate. This brings the state’s overall postsecondary attainment rate to 47 percent.

    As the data in this report make clear, increasing overall attainment is not the only challenge Nebraska faces. There are also significant gaps in attainment that must be closed. While current systems work very well for many students, more postsecondary credentials must be earned by Americans who, by definition, are post-traditional learners. Compared with current students, they will be older; more will be African-American, Hispanic and Native American; and they will have lower incomes. Most will be first-generation students. The data in this report show the extent of the attainment gaps in Nebraska by race and ethnicity.

    To date, 26 states have responded to the need to increase attainment by setting state attainment goals that meet Lumina’s criteria for rigor and efficacy (i.e., the goal is quantifiable, challenging, long term, addresses gaps, and is in statute and/or a strategic plan). Our analysis shows that Nebraska has not set a goal that meets Lumina’s criteria; we urge state leaders to do so.

    This year, for the first time, we have nationally representative data on the number of Americans who hold high-quality postsecondary certificates; we now feel confident we can count these credentials toward attainment goals. In states, we are able to use estimates from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce on the number of residents who hold high-quality certificates as their highest earned credential. In Nevada, 4 percent of residents between the ages of 25 and 64 hold a high-quality certificate. This brings the state’s overall postsecondary attainment rate to 35.3 percent.

    As the data in this report make clear, increasing overall attainment is not the only challenge Nevada faces. There are also significant gaps in attainment that must be closed. While current systems work very well for many students, more postsecondary credentials must be earned by Americans who, by definition, are post-traditional learners. Compared with current students, they will be older; more will be African-American, Hispanic and Native American; and they will have lower incomes. Most will be first-generation students. The data in this report show the extent of the attainment gaps in Nevada by race and ethnicity.

    To date, 26 states have responded to the need to increase attainment by setting state attainment goals that meet Lumina’s criteria for rigor and efficacy (i.e., the goal is quantifiable, challenging, long term, addresses gaps, and is in statute and/or a strategic plan). Nevada is one of those 26 states.

    This year, for the first time, we have nationally representative data on the number of Americans who hold high-quality postsecondary certificates; we now feel confident we can count these credentials toward attainment goals. In states, we are able to use estimates from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce on the number of residents who hold high-quality certificates as their highest earned credential. In New Hampshire, 2 percent of residents between the ages of 25 and 64 hold a high-quality certificate. This brings the state’s overall postsecondary attainment rate to 49.2 percent.

    As the data in this report make clear, increasing overall attainment is not the only challenge New Hampshire faces. There are also significant gaps in attainment that must be closed. While current systems work very well for many students, more postsecondary credentials must be earned by Americans who, by definition, are post-traditional learners. Compared with current students, they will be older; more will be African-American, Hispanic and Native American; and they will have lower incomes. Most will be first-generation students. The data in this report show the extent of the attainment gaps in New Hampshire by race and ethnicity.

    To date, 26 states have responded to the need to increase attainment by setting state attainment goals that meet Lumina’s criteria for rigor and efficacy (i.e., the goal is quantifiable, challenging, long term, addresses gaps, and is in statute and/or a strategic plan). New Hampshire is one of those 26 states.

    This year, for the first time, we have nationally representative data on the number of Americans who hold high-quality postsecondary certificates; we now feel confident we can count these credentials toward attainment goals. In states, we are able to use estimates from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce on the number of residents who hold high-quality certificates as their highest earned credential. In New Jersey, 3 percent of residents between the ages of 25 and 64 hold a high-quality certificate. This brings the state’s overall postsecondary attainment rate to 50.1 percent.

    As the data in this report make clear, increasing overall attainment is not the only challenge New Jersey faces. There are also significant gaps in attainment that must be closed. While current systems work very well for many students, more postsecondary credentials must be earned by Americans who, by definition, are post-traditional learners. Compared with current students, they will be older; more will be African-American, Hispanic and Native American; and they will have lower incomes. Most will be first-generation students. The data in this report show the extent of the attainment gaps in New Jersey by race and ethnicity.

    To date, 26 states have responded to the need to increase attainment by setting state attainment goals that meet Lumina’s criteria for rigor and efficacy (i.e., the goal is quantifiable, challenging, long term, addresses gaps, and is in statute and/or a strategic plan). Our analysis shows that New Jersey has not set a goal that meets Lumina’s criteria; we urge state leaders to do so.

    This year, for the first time, we have nationally representative data on the number of Americans who hold high-quality postsecondary certificates; we now feel confident we can count these credentials toward attainment goals. In states, we are able to use estimates from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce on the number of residents who hold high-quality certificates as their highest earned credential. In New Mexico, 9 percent of residents between the ages of 25 and 64 hold a high-quality certificate. This brings the state’s overall postsecondary attainment rate to 43.6 percent.

    As the data in this report make clear, increasing overall attainment is not the only challenge New Mexico faces. There are also significant gaps in attainment that must be closed. While current systems work very well for many students, more postsecondary credentials must be earned by Americans who, by definition, are post-traditional learners. Compared with current students, they will be older; more will be African-American, Hispanic and Native American; and they will have lower incomes. Most will be first-generation students. The data in this report show the extent of the attainment gaps in New Mexico by race and ethnicity.

    To date, 26 states have responded to the need to increase attainment by setting state attainment goals that meet Lumina’s criteria for rigor and efficacy (i.e., the goal is quantifiable, challenging, long term, addresses gaps, and is in statute and/or a strategic plan). Our analysis shows that New Mexico has not set a goal that meets Lumina’s criteria; we urge state leaders to do so.

    This year, for the first time, we have nationally representative data on the number of Americans who hold high-quality postsecondary certificates; we now feel confident we can count these credentials toward attainment goals. In states, we are able to use estimates from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce on the number of residents who hold high-quality certificates as their highest earned credential. In New York, 3 percent of residents between the ages of 25 and 64 hold a high-quality certificate. This brings the state’s overall postsecondary attainment rate to 49.3 percent.

    As the data in this report make clear, increasing overall attainment is not the only challenge New York faces. There are also significant gaps in attainment that must be closed. While current systems work very well for many students, more postsecondary credentials must be earned by Americans who, by definition, are post-traditional learners. Compared with current students, they will be older; more will be African-American, Hispanic and Native American; and they will have lower incomes. Most will be first-generation students. The data in this report show the extent of the attainment gaps in New York by race and ethnicity.

    To date, 26 states have responded to the need to increase attainment by setting state attainment goals that meet Lumina’s criteria for rigor and efficacy (i.e., the goal is quantifiable, challenging, long term, addresses gaps, and is in statute and/or a strategic plan). Our analysis shows that New York has not set a goal that meets Lumina’s criteria; we urge state leaders to do so.

    This year, for the first time, we have nationally representative data on the number of Americans who hold high-quality postsecondary certificates; we now feel confident we can count these credentials toward attainment goals. In states, we are able to use estimates from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce on the number of residents who hold high-quality certificates as their highest earned credential. In North Carolina, 5 percent of residents between the ages of 25 and 64 hold a high-quality certificate. This brings the state’s overall postsecondary attainment rate to 45.3 percent.

    As the data in this report make clear, increasing overall attainment is not the only challenge North Carolina faces. There are also significant gaps in attainment that must be closed. While current systems work very well for many students, more postsecondary credentials must be earned by Americans who, by definition, are post-traditional learners. Compared with current students, they will be older; more will be African-American, Hispanic and Native American; and they will have lower incomes. Most will be first-generation students. The data in this report show the extent of the attainment gaps in North Carolina by race and ethnicity.

    To date, 26 states have responded to the need to increase attainment by setting state attainment goals that meet Lumina’s criteria for rigor and efficacy (i.e., the goal is quantifiable, challenging, long term, addresses gaps, and is in statute and/or a strategic plan). Our analysis shows that North Carolina has not set a goal that meets Lumina’s criteria; we urge state leaders to do so.

    This year, for the first time, we have nationally representative data on the number of Americans who hold high-quality postsecondary certificates; we now feel confident we can count these credentials toward attainment goals. In states, we are able to use estimates from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce on the number of residents who hold high-quality certificates as their highest earned credential. In North Dakota, 2 percent of residents between the ages of 25 and 64 hold a high-quality certificate. This brings the state’s overall postsecondary attainment rate to 47.2 percent.

    As the data in this report make clear, increasing overall attainment is not the only challenge North Dakota faces. There are also significant gaps in attainment that must be closed. While current systems work very well for many students, more postsecondary credentials must be earned by Americans who, by definition, are post-traditional learners. Compared with current students, they will be older; more will be African-American, Hispanic and Native American; and they will have lower incomes. Most will be first-generation students. The data in this report show the extent of the attainment gaps in North Dakota by race and ethnicity.

    To date, 26 states have responded to the need to increase attainment by setting state attainment goals that meet Lumina’s criteria for rigor and efficacy (i.e., the goal is quantifiable, challenging, long term, addresses gaps, and is in statute and/or a strategic plan). Our analysis shows that North Dakota has not set a goal that meets Lumina’s criteria; we urge state leaders to do so.

    This year, for the first time, we have nationally representative data on the number of Americans who hold high-quality postsecondary certificates; we now feel confident we can count these credentials toward attainment goals. In states, we are able to use estimates from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce on the number of residents who hold high-quality certificates as their highest earned credential. In Ohio, 5 percent of residents between the ages of 25 and 64 hold a high-quality certificate. This brings the state’s overall postsecondary attainment rate to 43.2 percent.

    As the data in this report make clear, increasing overall attainment is not the only challenge Ohio faces. There are also significant gaps in attainment that must be closed. While current systems work very well for many students, more postsecondary credentials must be earned by Americans who, by definition, are post-traditional learners. Compared with current students, they will be older; more will be African-American, Hispanic and Native American; and they will have lower incomes. Most will be first-generation students. The data in this report show the extent of the attainment gaps in Ohio by race and ethnicity.

    To date, 26 states have responded to the need to increase attainment by setting state attainment goals that meet Lumina’s criteria for rigor and efficacy (i.e., the goal is quantifiable, challenging, long term, addresses gaps, and is in statute and/or a strategic plan). Our analysis shows that Ohio has not set a goal that meets Lumina’s criteria; we urge state leaders to do so.

    This year, for the first time, we have nationally representative data on the number of Americans who hold high-quality postsecondary certificates; we now feel confident we can count these credentials toward attainment goals. In states, we are able to use estimates from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce on the number of residents who hold high-quality certificates as their highest earned credential. In Oklahoma, 7 percent of residents between the ages of 25 and 64 hold a high-quality certificate. This brings the state’s overall postsecondary attainment rate to 40.1 percent.

    As the data in this report make clear, increasing overall attainment is not the only challenge Oklahoma faces. There are also significant gaps in attainment that must be closed. While current systems work very well for many students, more postsecondary credentials must be earned by Americans who, by definition, are post-traditional learners. Compared with current students, they will be older; more will be African-American, Hispanic and Native American; and they will have lower incomes. Most will be first-generation students. The data in this report show the extent of the attainment gaps in Oklahoma by race and ethnicity.

    To date, 26 states have responded to the need to increase attainment by setting state attainment goals that meet Lumina’s criteria for rigor and efficacy (i.e., the goal is quantifiable, challenging, long term, addresses gaps, and is in statute and/or a strategic plan). Our analysis shows that Oklahoma has not set a goal that meets Lumina’s criteria; we urge state leaders to do so.

    This year, for the first time, we have nationally representative data on the number of Americans who hold high-quality postsecondary certificates; we now feel confident we can count these credentials toward attainment goals. In states, we are able to use estimates from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce on the number of residents who hold high-quality certificates as their highest earned credential. In Oregon, 4 percent of residents between the ages of 25 and 64 hold a high-quality certificate. This brings the state’s overall postsecondary attainment rate to 44.7 percent.

    As the data in this report make clear, increasing overall attainment is not the only challenge Oregon faces. There are also significant gaps in attainment that must be closed. While current systems work very well for many students, more postsecondary credentials must be earned by Americans who, by definition, are post-traditional learners. Compared with current students, they will be older; more will be African-American, Hispanic and Native American; and they will have lower incomes. Most will be first-generation students. The data in this report show the extent of the attainment gaps in Oregon by race and ethnicity.

    To date, 26 states have responded to the need to increase attainment by setting state attainment goals that meet Lumina’s criteria for rigor and efficacy (i.e., the goal is quantifiable, challenging, long term, addresses gaps, and is in statute and/or a strategic plan). Oregon is one of those 26 states.

    This year, for the first time, we have nationally representative data on the number of Americans who hold high-quality postsecondary certificates; we now feel confident we can count these credentials toward attainment goals. In states, we are able to use estimates from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce on the number of residents who hold high-quality certificates as their highest earned credential. In Pennsylvania, 3 percent of residents between the ages of 25 and 64 hold a high-quality certificate. This brings the state’s overall postsecondary attainment rate to 43.8 percent.

    As the data in this report make clear, increasing overall attainment is not the only challenge Pennsylvania faces. There are also significant gaps in attainment that must be closed. While current systems work very well for many students, more postsecondary credentials must be earned by Americans who, by definition, are post-traditional learners. Compared with current students, they will be older; more will be African-American, Hispanic and Native American; and they will have lower incomes. Most will be first-generation students. The data in this report show the extent of the attainment gaps in Pennsylvania by race and ethnicity.

    To date, 26 states have responded to the need to increase attainment by setting state attainment goals that meet Lumina’s criteria for rigor and efficacy (i.e., the goal is quantifiable, challenging, long term, addresses gaps, and is in statute and/or a strategic plan). Our analysis shows that Pennsylvania has not set a goal that meets Lumina’s criteria; we urge state leaders to do so.

    This year, for the first time, we have nationally representative data on the number of Americans who hold high-quality postsecondary certificates; we now feel confident we can count these credentials toward attainment goals. In states, we are able to use estimates from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce on the number of residents who hold high-quality certificates as their highest earned credential. In Rhode Island, 2 percent of residents between the ages of 25 and 64 hold a high-quality certificate. This brings the state’s overall postsecondary attainment rate to 43.1 percent.

    As the data in this report make clear, increasing overall attainment is not the only challenge Rhode Island faces. There are also significant gaps in attainment that must be closed. While current systems work very well for many students, more postsecondary credentials must be earned by Americans who, by definition, are post-traditional learners. Compared with current students, they will be older; more will be African-American, Hispanic and Native American; and they will have lower incomes. Most will be first-generation students. The data in this report show the extent of the attainment gaps in Rhode Island by race and ethnicity.

    To date, 26 states have responded to the need to increase attainment by setting state attainment goals that meet Lumina’s criteria for rigor and efficacy (i.e., the goal is quantifiable, challenging, long term, addresses gaps, and is in statute and/or a strategic plan). Rhode Island is one of those 26 states.

    This year, for the first time, we have nationally representative data on the number of Americans who hold high-quality postsecondary certificates; we now feel confident we can count these credentials toward attainment goals. In states, we are able to use estimates from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce on the number of residents who hold high-quality certificates as their highest earned credential. In South Carolina, 4 percent of residents between the ages of 25 and 64 hold a high-quality certificate. This brings the state’s overall postsecondary attainment rate to 40.7 percent.

    As the data in this report make clear, increasing overall attainment is not the only challenge South Carolina faces. There are also significant gaps in attainment that must be closed. While current systems work very well for many students, more postsecondary credentials must be earned by Americans who, by definition, are post-traditional learners. Compared with current students, they will be older; more will be African-American, Hispanic and Native American; and they will have lower incomes. Most will be first-generation students. The data in this report show the extent of the attainment gaps in South Carolina by race and ethnicity.

    To date, 26 states have responded to the need to increase attainment by setting state attainment goals that meet Lumina’s criteria for rigor and efficacy (i.e., the goal is quantifiable, challenging, long term, addresses gaps, and is in statute and/or a strategic plan). South Carolina is one of those 26 states.

    This year, for the first time, we have nationally representative data on the number of Americans who hold high-quality postsecondary certificates; we now feel confident we can count these credentials toward attainment goals. In states, we are able to use estimates from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce on the number of residents who hold high-quality certificates as their highest earned credential. In South Dakota, 2 percent of residents between the ages of 25 and 64 hold a high-quality certificate. This brings the state’s overall postsecondary attainment rate to 45.1 percent.

    As the data in this report make clear, increasing overall attainment is not the only challenge South Dakota faces. There are also significant gaps in attainment that must be closed. While current systems work very well for many students, more postsecondary credentials must be earned by Americans who, by definition, are post-traditional learners. Compared with current students, they will be older; more will be African-American, Hispanic and Native American; and they will have lower incomes. Most will be first-generation students. The data in this report show the extent of the attainment gaps in South Dakota by race and ethnicity.

    To date, 26 states have responded to the need to increase attainment by setting state attainment goals that meet Lumina’s criteria for rigor and efficacy (i.e., the goal is quantifiable, challenging, long term, addresses gaps, and is in statute and/or a strategic plan). Our analysis shows that South Dakota has not set a goal that meets Lumina’s criteria; we urge state leaders to do so.

    This year, for the first time, we have nationally representative data on the number of Americans who hold high-quality postsecondary certificates; we now feel confident we can count these credentials toward attainment goals. In states, we are able to use estimates from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce on the number of residents who hold high-quality certificates as their highest earned credential. In Tennessee, 5 percent of residents between the ages of 25 and 64 hold a high-quality certificate. This brings the state’s overall postsecondary attainment rate to 39.3 percent.

    As the data in this report make clear, increasing overall attainment is not the only challenge Tennessee faces. There are also significant gaps in attainment that must be closed. While current systems work very well for many students, more postsecondary credentials must be earned by Americans who, by definition, are post-traditional learners. Compared with current students, they will be older; more will be African-American, Hispanic and Native American; and they will have lower incomes. Most will be first-generation students. The data in this report show the extent of the attainment gaps in Tennessee by race and ethnicity.

    To date, 26 states have responded to the need to increase attainment by setting state attainment goals that meet Lumina’s criteria for rigor and efficacy (i.e., the goal is quantifiable, challenging, long term, addresses gaps, and is in statute and/or a strategic plan). Tennessee is one of those 26 states.

    This year, for the first time, we have nationally representative data on the number of Americans who hold high-quality postsecondary certificates; we now feel confident we can count these credentials toward attainment goals. In states, we are able to use estimates from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce on the number of residents who hold high-quality certificates as their highest earned credential. In Texas, 5 percent of residents between the ages of 25 and 64 hold a high-quality certificate. This brings the state’s overall postsecondary attainment rate to 40.8 percent.

    As the data in this report make clear, increasing overall attainment is not the only challenge Texas faces. There are also significant gaps in attainment that must be closed. While current systems work very well for many students, more postsecondary credentials must be earned by Americans who, by definition, are post-traditional learners. Compared with current students, they will be older; more will be African-American, Hispanic and Native American; and they will have lower incomes. Most will be first-generation students. The data in this report show the extent of the attainment gaps in Texas by race and ethnicity.

    To date, 26 states have responded to the need to increase attainment by setting state attainment goals that meet Lumina’s criteria for rigor and efficacy (i.e., the goal is quantifiable, challenging, long term, addresses gaps, and is in statute and/or a strategic plan). Texas is one of those 26 states.

    This year, for the first time, we have nationally representative data on the number of Americans who hold high-quality postsecondary certificates; we now feel confident we can count these credentials toward attainment goals. In states, we are able to use estimates from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce on the number of residents who hold high-quality certificates as their highest earned credential. In Utah, 6 percent of residents between the ages of 25 and 64 hold a high-quality certificate. This brings the state’s overall postsecondary attainment rate to 47.9 percent.

    As the data in this report make clear, increasing overall attainment is not the only challenge Utah faces. There are also significant gaps in attainment that must be closed. While current systems work very well for many students, more postsecondary credentials must be earned by Americans who, by definition, are post-traditional learners. Compared with current students, they will be older; more will be African-American, Hispanic and Native American; and they will have lower incomes. Most will be first-generation students. The data in this report show the extent of the attainment gaps in Utah by race and ethnicity.

    To date, 26 states have responded to the need to increase attainment by setting state attainment goals that meet Lumina’s criteria for rigor and efficacy (i.e., the goal is quantifiable, challenging, long term, addresses gaps, and is in statute and/or a strategic plan). Utah is one of those 26 states.

    This year, for the first time, we have nationally representative data on the number of Americans who hold high-quality postsecondary certificates; we now feel confident we can count these credentials toward attainment goals. In states, we are able to use estimates from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce on the number of residents who hold high-quality certificates as their highest earned credential. In Vermont, 1 percent of residents between the ages of 25 and 64 hold a high-quality certificate. This brings the state’s overall postsecondary attainment rate to 45.3 percent.

    As the data in this report make clear, increasing overall attainment is not the only challenge Vermont faces. There are also significant gaps in attainment that must be closed. While current systems work very well for many students, more postsecondary credentials must be earned by Americans who, by definition, are post-traditional learners. Compared with current students, they will be older; more will be African-American, Hispanic and Native American; and they will have lower incomes. Most will be first-generation students. The data in this report show the extent of the attainment gaps in Vermont by race and ethnicity.

    To date, 26 states have responded to the need to increase attainment by setting state attainment goals that meet Lumina’s criteria for rigor and efficacy (i.e., the goal is quantifiable, challenging, long term, addresses gaps, and is in statute and/or a strategic plan). Our analysis shows that Vermont has not set a goal that meets Lumina’s criteria; we urge state leaders to do so.

    This year, for the first time, we have nationally representative data on the number of Americans who hold high-quality postsecondary certificates; we now feel confident we can count these credentials toward attainment goals. In states, we are able to use estimates from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce on the number of residents who hold high-quality certificates as their highest earned credential. In Virginia, 4 percent of residents between the ages of 25 and 64 hold a high-quality certificate. This brings the state’s overall postsecondary attainment rate to 50.6 percent.

    As the data in this report make clear, increasing overall attainment is not the only challenge Virginia faces. There are also significant gaps in attainment that must be closed. While current systems work very well for many students, more postsecondary credentials must be earned by Americans who, by definition, are post-traditional learners. Compared with current students, they will be older; more will be African-American, Hispanic and Native American; and they will have lower incomes. Most will be first-generation students. The data in this report show the extent of the attainment gaps in Virginia by race and ethnicity.

    To date, 26 states have responded to the need to increase attainment by setting state attainment goals that meet Lumina’s criteria for rigor and efficacy (i.e., the goal is quantifiable, challenging, long term, addresses gaps, and is in statute and/or a strategic plan). Virginia is one of those 26 states.

    This year, for the first time, we have nationally representative data on the number of Americans who hold high-quality postsecondary certificates; we now feel confident we can count these credentials toward attainment goals. In states, we are able to use estimates from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce on the number of residents who hold high-quality certificates as their highest earned credential. In Washington, 7 percent of residents between the ages of 25 and 64 hold a high-quality certificate. This brings the state’s overall postsecondary attainment rate to 51.6 percent.

    As the data in this report make clear, increasing overall attainment is not the only challenge Washington faces. There are also significant gaps in attainment that must be closed. While current systems work very well for many students, more postsecondary credentials must be earned by Americans who, by definition, are post-traditional learners. Compared with current students, they will be older; more will be African-American, Hispanic and Native American; and they will have lower incomes. Most will be first-generation students. The data in this report show the extent of the attainment gaps in Washington by race and ethnicity.

    To date, 26 states have responded to the need to increase attainment by setting state attainment goals that meet Lumina’s criteria for rigor and efficacy (i.e., the goal is quantifiable, challenging, long term, addresses gaps, and is in statute and/or a strategic plan). Washington is one of those 26 states.

    This year, for the first time, we have nationally representative data on the number of Americans who hold high-quality postsecondary certificates; we now feel confident we can count these credentials toward attainment goals. In states, we are able to use estimates from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce on the number of residents who hold high-quality certificates as their highest earned credential. In West Virginia, 4 percent of residents between the ages of 25 and 64 hold a high-quality certificate. This brings the state’s overall postsecondary attainment rate to 32.6 percent.

    As the data in this report make clear, increasing overall attainment is not the only challenge West Virginia faces. There are also significant gaps in attainment that must be closed. While current systems work very well for many students, more postsecondary credentials must be earned by Americans who, by definition, are post-traditional learners. Compared with current students, they will be older; more will be African-American, Hispanic and Native American; and they will have lower incomes. Most will be first-generation students. The data in this report show the extent of the attainment gaps in West Virginia by race and ethnicity.

    To date, 26 states have responded to the need to increase attainment by setting state attainment goals that meet Lumina’s criteria for rigor and efficacy (i.e., the goal is quantifiable, challenging, long term, addresses gaps, and is in statute and/or a strategic plan). Our analysis shows that West Virginia has not set a goal that meets Lumina’s criteria; we urge state leaders to do so.

    This year, for the first time, we have nationally representative data on the number of Americans who hold high-quality postsecondary certificates; we now feel confident we can count these credentials toward attainment goals. In states, we are able to use estimates from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce on the number of residents who hold high-quality certificates as their highest earned credential. In Wisconsin, 5 percent of residents between the ages of 25 and 64 hold a high-quality certificate. This brings the state’s overall postsecondary attainment rate to 47.1 percent.

    As the data in this report make clear, increasing overall attainment is not the only challenge Wisconsin faces. There are also significant gaps in attainment that must be closed. While current systems work very well for many students, more postsecondary credentials must be earned by Americans who, by definition, are post-traditional learners. Compared with current students, they will be older; more will be African-American, Hispanic and Native American; and they will have lower incomes. Most will be first-generation students. The data in this report show the extent of the attainment gaps in Wisconsin by race and ethnicity.

    To date, 26 states have responded to the need to increase attainment by setting state attainment goals that meet Lumina’s criteria for rigor and efficacy (i.e., the goal is quantifiable, challenging, long term, addresses gaps, and is in statute and/or a strategic plan). Our analysis shows that Wisconsin has not set a goal that meets Lumina’s criteria; we urge state leaders to do so.

    This year, for the first time, we have nationally representative data on the number of Americans who hold high-quality postsecondary certificates; we now feel confident we can count these credentials toward attainment goals. In states, we are able to use estimates from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce on the number of residents who hold high-quality certificates as their highest earned credential. In Wyoming, 8 percent of residents between the ages of 25 and 64 hold a high-quality certificate. This brings the state’s overall postsecondary attainment rate to 46.4 percent.

    As the data in this report make clear, increasing overall attainment is not the only challenge Wyoming faces. There are also significant gaps in attainment that must be closed. While current systems work very well for many students, more postsecondary credentials must be earned by Americans who, by definition, are post-traditional learners. Compared with current students, they will be older; more will be African-American, Hispanic and Native American; and they will have lower incomes. Most will be first-generation students. The data in this report show the extent of the attainment gaps in Wyoming by race and ethnicity.

    To date, 26 states have responded to the need to increase attainment by setting state attainment goals that meet Lumina’s criteria for rigor and efficacy (i.e., the goal is quantifiable, challenging, long term, addresses gaps, and is in statute and/or a strategic plan). Our analysis shows that Wyoming has not set a goal that meets Lumina’s criteria; we urge state leaders to do so.

    Lumina is working with state leaders from around the nation to expand postsecondary opportunity and success. More information on that work, including our full state policy agenda and additional data, is available on Lumina’s Strategy Labs website.

    With eight of every 10 Americans now living in cities or suburbs, it is clear that the nation’s metropolitan regions need to be prime drivers in the Goal 2025 effort. Simply put, if we want to boost postsecondary attainment, we must look first and work hardest in those places with the most students.

    Just as important: The nation’s metro areas are well suited for this work. They are natural sites for the kind of collaborations that are necessary to boost student success – active coalitions of political, business, education, philanthropic and community-based leaders.

    To help with the effort in your metro region, begin here, with the data that tell the story of your specific area.

    College enrollment among United States residents, ages 18-54

    1. Bar 1: Total Enrollment
    2. Bar 2: Ages 18-24
    3. Bar 3: Ages 25-54
    4. Bar 4: Hispanic
    5. Bar 5: African American
    6. Bar 6: Native American
    7. Bar 7: Asian/ Pacific Islander
    8. Bar 8: White

    Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2014 American Community Survey One-Year Public Use Microdata Sample

    Note: These percentages reflect the enrollment of non-degree-holding students, ages 18-54, at public and private, two-year and four-year postsecondary institutions.

    The trend in degree-attainment rates for United States
    residents (ages 25-64), by population group

    • Total
    • White
    • African-American
    • Hispanic
    • Asian/Pacific Islander
    • Native American
    Source: U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey PUMS Files

    Percentage of adults (25-64) with at least an associate degree, by metropolitan region

    Download detailed mapDownload detailed map

    Click the column headings to sort accordingly

    Rank By
    Population
    Area Name Rate Population

    Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010-14 American Community Survey Five-Year Estimates. (U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division; Annual Estimates of the Resident Population April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014)

    Highlighted Cities: The metropolitan areas displayed in boldface are communities in which Lumina supports a Community Partnership for Attainment (CPA), a partnership of organizations across the community focused on postsecondary attainment. Many CPA sites focus on geographic areas other than the entire MSA.

    Note: This chart lists Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs). The term MSA refers to a large population nucleus, together with adjacent communities having a high degree of social and economic integration with that core. MSAs comprise one or more entire counties, except in New England, where cities and towns are the basic geographic units. The federal Office of Management and Budget defines MSAs for purposes of collecting, tabulating and publishing federal data. These definitions result from applying published standards to Census Bureau data.

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